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Paul Newman in Cool Hand Luke (1967).

haroldbeldonmisterdeath:

How to Properly Respond to Gossip, a guide by Jay Gatsby


“He has good character, and not many people do. I think he would rather not do anything wrong, whether on a moral or an artistic level. He is what you call a man of conscious- not necessarily of judgement, but of conscious. I don’t know any other actors like that.”-Gore Vidal on Paul Newman

“He has good character, and not many people do. I think he would rather not do anything wrong, whether on a moral or an artistic level. He is what you call a man of conscious- not necessarily of judgement, but of conscious. I don’t know any other actors like that.”
-Gore Vidal on Paul Newman

(Source: terrysmalloy)


I had a wonderful time working with Natalie, not only because of her innate talent, but she also loved to laugh and joke around on the set. And we teased each other a lot. 
Robert Redford on Natalie Wood.

I had a wonderful time working with Natalie, not only because of her innate talent, but she also loved to laugh and joke around on the set. And we teased each other a lot.

Robert Redford on Natalie Wood.

rainorsundance:

“Robert was so young, so brilliant, and women loved him. He was the most beautiful guy anyone ever saw. There was no question where he was going. Diane [Sawyer] and I live in his old apartment now.”
—Mike Nichols

rainorsundance:

“Robert was so young, so brilliant, and women loved him. He was the most beautiful guy anyone ever saw. There was no question where he was going. Diane [Sawyer] and I live in his old apartment now.”

—Mike Nichols

redfordmcqueenandnewman:

fuckyeahmikenichols:

Robert Redford in “Barefoot in the Park” (1963).

During “Barefoot in the Park,” Redford came to Nichols in a quandary: he was being upstaged by the showy Elizabeth Ashley. “I can’t bear it,” he told Nichols. “Every night when I kiss Ashley, she kicks her leg up behind her. I feel like I’ve been used. I’m embarassed.”
“Why don’t you do it, too?” Nichols suggested. Redford did as he was told and got a huge laugh; Ashley promptly stopped her upstaging.
(The New Yorker, 2000)

redfordmcqueenandnewman:

fuckyeahmikenichols:

Robert Redford in “Barefoot in the Park” (1963).

During “Barefoot in the Park,” Redford came to Nichols in a quandary: he was being upstaged by the showy Elizabeth Ashley. “I can’t bear it,” he told Nichols. “Every night when I kiss Ashley, she kicks her leg up behind her. I feel like I’ve been used. I’m embarassed.”

“Why don’t you do it, too?” Nichols suggested. Redford did as he was told and got a huge laugh; Ashley promptly stopped her upstaging.

(The New Yorker, 2000)

Robert Redford in The Way We Were (1973).

Robert Redford in The Way We Were (1973).

allthingsthatareawesome:

“Lastly get emotionally connected to your story so you can deliver it, you know, if you can’t deliver the emotions to your script there’s no point to your story. Story is the key.”Robert Redford

allthingsthatareawesome:

“Lastly get emotionally connected to your story so you can deliver it, you know, if you can’t deliver the emotions to your script there’s no point to your story. Story is the key.”
Robert Redford

rainorsundance:

“Did women make much fuss before you were famous?” 
“No! Where were they when I needed them?”
—Robert Redford, 1974

rainorsundance:

“Did women make much fuss before you were famous?”

“No! Where were they when I needed them?”

—Robert Redford, 1974

Paul Newman in The Young Philadelphians (1959). 

Paul Newman in The Young Philadelphians (1959). 

redfordmcqueenandnewman:

“I became fascinated by the fact that he had no interest in his beauty.  It was depressing, because he wanted to plaster his hair down and play the nerd.”—director of Barefoot in the Park
Robert Redford Biography

redfordmcqueenandnewman:

“I became fascinated by the fact that he had no interest in his beauty.  It was depressing, because he wanted to plaster his hair down and play the nerd.”—director of Barefoot in the Park

Robert Redford Biography

Paul Newman greets Robert Redford in The Sting (1973).

Paul Newman greets Robert Redford in The Sting (1973).

I owe fans the best performance I can give; I owe them an appearance on my set exactly on time; I owe them trying to work for the best I can, not just for money. But if somebody says that what I owe him is to stand up against a wall and take off my dark glasses so he can take a picture of my eyes, then I say, ‘No, I don’t owe you that.’ I try not to be hurtful. I say something like, ‘If I take off my glasses, my pants will fall down.’
I owe fans the best performance I can give; I owe them an appearance on my set exactly on time; I owe them trying to work for the best I can, not just for money. But if somebody says that what I owe him is to stand up against a wall and take off my dark glasses so he can take a picture of my eyes, then I say, ‘No, I don’t owe you that.’ I try not to be hurtful. I say something like, ‘If I take off my glasses, my pants will fall down.’

aetatiss:

Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward will forever be my favorite couple. Among the Hollywood elite of scattered broken marriages and messy affairs, they were married for fifty years. They just seemed like a normal happy pair who loved each other and who also happened to be famous movie stars.

By the time Paul Newman passed away in 2008, they lived in their quiet farmhouse in Connecticut for 48 years.

There is a point where feelings go beyond words. I have lost a real friend. My life - and this country - is better for his being in it.
—Robert Redford speaking about his close friend and co-star, Paul Newman, after Newman’s 2008 death.